Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Goy: The Correct Definition: Argument 1

Proposition

All non-Jews do not fit under the category of stam(simply) "goy" in regards to halachah.

Argument 1

By the law of exclusion, I'll show that all non-Jews cannot be stam(simple) goyim. Some are called gerim toshavim for instance and therefore have different hilchot(laws) that apply to them as explained in other parts of Mishneh Torah.

Statement 1

The Rambam defines "goy" as an idolator.

"...and any place we say simply 'goy', we mean an idolater."
"וכל מקום שנאמר 'גוי' סתם, הרי זה עובד עבודה זרה..."
 - Hilchot Ma'achalot Assurot 11:8

Reason 1

This is an explicit definition. It doesn't get any clearer than an explicit definition. As people who believe the Mishneh Torah to be true, we can conclude this statement to be true.

Statement 2

The Rambam defines "ger toshav" as not an idolator.

"What is meant by a ger toshav? This is a goy who does not worship idols..."
"איזה הוא גר תושב: זה גוי שקיבל עליו שלא יעבוד עבודה זרה"
 - Hilchot Issurei Bi'ah 14:7

Reason 2

This is another explicit definition. Rambam can define the terms explicitly and then we play by his rules. As people who believe the Mishneh Torah to be true, we can conclude this statement to be true.

Conclusion

Therefore, because stam goyim are idol worshippers by definition, and goyim who forsake idol worshippers are no longer stam goyim, but rather gerim toshavim, then we can say that all non-Jews do not fit under the stam "goy" class of people and their respective halachot and rather, there are actually sub-groups of non-Jews: at least two we know so far just in this argument: goyim(non-Jew idolators) and gerim toshavim(non-Jew non-idolators).

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